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FITNESS TESTS

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Fitness Tests are designed to test your Aerobic Capacity, Anaerobic Capacity,

Power, Strength, Agility, Flexibility and Speed.

Here are some Fitness Tests to use in classes.

 VERTICAL Jump

 Max Push Ups

 1 minute Sit Ups

 Sprint 35m

 Hand Grip Dynamometer

 Sit and Reach

 Multistage 20 metre Shuttle Run Fitness Test

 Illinois Agility Test

 

 

Vertical Jump Test

- Description / Procedure: The athlete stands side on to a wall and reaches up with the hand closest to the wall. Keeping the feet flat on the ground, the point of the fingertips is marked or recorded. The athlete then stands away from the wall, and jumps vertically as high as possible using both arms and legs to assist in projecting the body upwards. Attempt to touch the wall at the highest point of the jump. The difference in distance between the reach height and the jump height is the score. The best of three attempts is recorded.

- Modifications: Jump height can also be measured using a timing mat which measures the time the feet are off the mat. From the time, jump height can be calculated. To be accurate, you must ensure the feet land back on the mat with legs nearly fully extended. Other test modifications are to perform the test with no arm movement (one hand on hip, the other raised above the head) to isolate the leg muscles and reduce the effect of variations in coordination of the arm movements. The test can also be performed off one leg, with a step into the jump, or with a run-up, depending on the relevance to the sport involved.

- Scoring: The jump height Jump is usually recorded as the score in distance. The table below provides a ranking scale for adult athletes based on my observations, and will give a general idea of what is a good score.

 To see how you scored, click here

- Equipment required: Measuring tape or marked wall, chalk for marking wall (or timing mat).

- Advantages: Simple and quick to perform.

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 Max Push Ups

How many can you do? Men should use the standard "military style" push up position with only the hands and the toes touching the floor. Women have the additional option of using the "bent knee" position. To do this, kneel on the floor, hands on either side of the chest and keep your back straight. Do as many push ups as possible until exhaustion. Count the total number of push ups performed. Use the chart below to find out how you rate.

 To see how you scored, click here

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1 minute Sit Ups

How many sit-ups can you do in 1 minute? Count how many you can do in one minute and then click the "click here" to check your score. 

- Starting Position: Lie on the floor with your knees bent, feet flat. Your hands should rest on your thighs.

- Technique: Squeeze your stomach, push your back flat and raise high enough for your hands to touch the tops of your knees. Don't pull with you neck or head and keep your lower back on the floor.

To see how you scored, click here

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Sprint 35m

- Description / Procedure: The purpose of this test is to determine maximum running speed. It involves running a single maximum sprint over a set distance, with time recorded. The test is conducted over different distances, such as 10, 20, 40 and/or 50 metres, depending on the sport and what you are trying to measure. The starting position should be standardised, starting from a stationary position, with no rocking movements. If you have the equipment (e.g. timing gates), you can measure the time to run each split distances (e.g. 5, 10, 20m) during the same run, and then acceleration and peak velocity can also be determined. It is usual to give the athletes an adequate warm-up and practice first, and some encouragement to continue running hard past the finish line.

- Equipment required: Measuring tape or marked track, stopwatch or timing gates, markers.

- Target population: Sprinters, team sport athletes.

- Reliability: Reliability is greatly improved if timing gates are used. Also weather conditions and running surface can affect the results, and these conditions should be recorded with the results. If possible, set up the track with a crosswind to minimize the effect of wind.

- Norms: The rating system below is for a 35 m sprint test.

To see how you scored, click here

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Hand Grip Dynamometer

- Description / procedure: Subject holds the dynamometer in one hand in line with the forearm and hanging by the thigh. Maximum grip strength is then determined without swinging the arm.

- Scoring: The best of two trials for each hand is recorded. The values below (in Kg) give a guide to scores expected for adults. They are the average of the best scores of each hand.

To see how you scored, click here

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Sit and Reach

- Description / Procedure: This test involves sitting on the floor with legs out straight ahead. Feet (shoes off) are placed flat against the box. Both knees are held flat against the floor by the tester. The athlete leans forward slowly as far as possible and holds the greatest stretch for two seconds. Make sure there is no jerky movements, and that the fingertips remain level and the legs flat.

- Scoring: The score is recorded as the distance before (negative) or beyond (positive) the toes. Repeat twice and record the best score. Click below, to see the expected scores (in cm) for adults 

To see how you scored, click here

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 Multistage 20 metre Shuttle Run Fitness Test

The multistage fitness test, is a very common test of aerobic fitness.
 

- Diagram:

- Description: This test involves continuous running between two lines 20m apart in time to recorded beeps. For this reason the test if also often called the 'beep' or 'bleep' test. The time between recorded beeps decrease each minute (level). There are several versions of the test, but one commonly used version has an initial running velocity of 8.5 km/hr, which increases by 0.5 km/hr each minute.

- Scoring: The athletes score is the level and number of shuttles reached before they were unable to keep up with the tape recording. To see how you scored, click here. This score can be converted to a VO2max equivalent score.

- Equipment required: Flat, non-slip surface, marking cones, 20m measuring tape, pre-recorded audio tape, tape recorder, recording sheets.

- Target population: Suitable for sports teams and school groups, but not for populations in which a maximal exercise test would be contraindicated.

- Reliability: Reliability would depend on how strictly the test is run, and the practice allowed for the subjects.

- Advantages: Large groups can perform this test all at once for minimal costs. Also, the test continues to maximum effort unlike many other tests of endurance capacity.

- Disadvantages: Practice and motivation levels can influence the score attained, and the scoring can be subjective. As the test is usually conducted outside, the environmental conditions can be often affect the results.

- Variations: You will find that there are several different variations of this test, and you should ensure that you have norms relevant to the correct test. Another shuttle type of test that has been pointed out to me is the Aero test, which is like the bleep test but each bleep is 0.05 km/h quicker than the last one and there are no level. It is a 20m shuttle run and each 20m counts as a score of one.

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Illinois Agility Test

 

- Diagram:

 

- Description: The length of the course is 10 metres and the width (distance between the start and finish points) is 5 metres. 4 cones are used to mark the start, finish and the two turning points. Another four cones are placed down the centre an equal distance apart. Each cone in the centre is spaced 3.3 metres apart.

- Procedure: Subjects should lie on their front (head to the start line) and hands by their shoulders. On the 'Go' command the stopwatch is started, and the athlete gets up as quickly as possible and runs around the course in the direction indicated, without knocking the cones over, to the finish line, at which the timing is stopped.
 

- Equipment required: flat non-slip surface, cones, stopwatch, measuring tape.

- Results: To see how you scored, click here

- Advantages: This is a simple test to administer, requiring little equipment. Can test players ability to turn in different directions, and different angles.

- Disadvantages: Choice of footwear and surface of area can effect times greatly. Results can be subject to timing inconsistencies, which may be overcome by using timing gates. Cannot distinguish between left and right turning ability.

- Variations: the starting and finishing sides can be swapped, so that turning direction is changed.

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